»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
WHERE AMERICA SHOPPED
March 21st, 2014 by Clark Humphrey

theryanrvexpress.blogspot.com

Here is a story about the world’s largest “shop from home” company, and the time it started an experimental business operation in Seattle that grew and grew.

The company was Sears, Roebuck and Co. (“Cheapest Supply House on Earth”, “Our Trade Reaches Around the World”).

The time was 1925.

The experiment was to expand from its famous “Big Book” mail order catalogs into what are now called “brick and mortar” retail stores. Urbanization and automobiles (two trends that now seem contradictory) had come to threaten Sears’ biggest market—rural families who wanted prices and selections they couldn’t get in small-town stores.

Because this was a new direction for a company that had grown huge on its existing business model, Sears management chose to save money by placing its first two retail stores in buildings it already owned—its catalog warehouses in Chicago (the company’s headquarters) and Seattle. (The Chicago flagship store closed a few decades back, leaving the Seattle store as the company’s oldest.)

The Sears Seattle warehouse building had been built a little over a decade before, in 1912. The Industrial District (later christened “Sodo” by local boosters) had just been created a few years before, from tide flats filled in with dirt from the city’s massive regrading projects. It was built for the company by the Union Pacific Railroad, whose freight tracks hugged its back side. It was built from solid old growth local timber, with handsome brick cladding and a clock tower (still the neighborhood’s tallest structure, other than container-dock cranes) on top.

It also happened to be two miles south of the city’s traditional retail core. This meant the store would rely less on foot traffic and more on folks driving expressly to go there. That meant it was a forbearer of suburban malls and big-box stores, trends Sears would ride on nationally in the post-WWII decades.

The store housed a subset of the catalog’s almost-everything selection (but not cars, or entire houses in kit form, or non-perishable groceries, three of the catalog’s once-popular sections). It had “soft goods” (clothes and linens). It had “hard goods” (appliances, hardware, auto parts, furniture). For a while, there was even a farm supply department.

In 1951, the new Alaskan Way Viaduct meant Sears was just off of the main highway through the city. A little over a decade later, I-5 would pass nearby.

Generations grew up with our own local version of the store advertised as “Where America Shops,” a chunk of middle class materialistic heaven surrounded by warehouse and small factories.

Perhaps the escalators were narrow and rickety, and the ceilings shorter, compared to newer stores in the malls; but Seattle’s Sears had its own charms. The popcorn machine and the candy counter. The cool pastel colored walls in the women’s department. The Saturday morning cartoons or Sunday afternoon sports games on the wall of TVs.

Meanwhile, the warehouse part of the building grew over the years to 2.2 million square feet, making it Seattle’s largest building by volume.

But the Sears catalogs were phased out in the mid 1980s. The building was put up for sale in 1990. It was first retitled SoDo Center, then Starbucks Center when the coffee giant moved its head offices into it.

The Sears retail store remained but shrank. Part of its space was taken up by by an Office Max. Home Depot opened a huge store across South Lander Street, competing with many of Sears’ “hard goods” departments.

The company wasn’t doing too well nationally by this time either. Walmart had overtaken both Sears and Kmart to become the nation’s top retailer. The 2004 merger of Sears and Kmart failed to revive either chain’s fortunes.

Thus, the end of the Sodo Sears store became inevitable.

Only 79 employees remained with the store when its closure was announced in February, 13 of them in the “Auto Center” department.

The store had become forgotten before it was gone.

(Cross posted with City Living Seattle.)


2 Responses  
  • Art Marriott AKA "ArtFart" writes:
    March 21st, 2014 at 12:21 pm

    It’s just slightly possible that one cause for Sears to start opening stores was the spread of inside plumbing and toilet paper. A century ago many rural households still had outhouses, and the Sears catalog became a staple of those, both to as reading material while taking care of business and for tearing pages out for cleaning one’s rear end afterwards.

  • PSPS writes:
    March 21st, 2014 at 6:04 pm

    I never “forgot” the 1st Ave. Sears store. I live near Alki and still go there regularly for clothes, tools, and just about everything else I need that they sell. I still remember being a kid and going to Sears on Saturday with my dad. The place was always packed with shoppers. They had those vacuum cleaner display with the salesman and his small patch of rug with the “demonstration debris” sprinkled on it, ready for the next prospective buyer. I think my dad even bought his suits there. Craftsman tools.

    Anyway, I think the real reason Sears and others of its ilk are disappearing is because their business model included paying their employees enough to live on comfortably (and buy the very products they were selling.) Such an idea is heresy today. To be a proper American business today, you have to include “how to apply for public assistance” in the orientation package for new employees and have donation bins in the store during the holidays so customers can donate food to the employees. Oh, and you also must now scream bloody murder lest you’re compelled to pay an employee an extra $20/day if the minimum wage is increased lest the CEO’s mistress can’t get her boob job or he misses out on purchasing that island.


Leave a Reply

»  Copyright 2012 Clark Humphrey (clark (at) miscmedia.com)   »  Substance: WordPress   »  Style: Ahren Ahimsa