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TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2017

Regular readers of this e-missive already know about the UW economics prof’s study about Seattle’s minimum-wage increase. The one that compares today’s Seattle to some “hypothetical Seattle” in which wages stayed down. As you’d expect from the prof’s ties to free-market PR groups, he claims the figures show our town would be even more prosperous and growing today than it is, if more people had a harder time makng ends meet.

The SeaTimes ran a big, laudatory piece about the UW study, that got picked up at the WaPo.

But before that article came out, a City-commisisoned study by Berkeley researchers (who have their own resumes of pro-wage-hike opinions) emerged. That study showed that rising wages didn’t lead to lost jobs—just the opposite. (Civic Skunk Works)

The researcher in charge of the UW study defends it as an honest look at a city that was already booming before the wage hike. (SeattleMet)

Charles Mudede says to “ignore” the UW report, calling it a biased work of “neo-classical,” pro-corporate economic propaganda.

The whole dispute is “an object lesson in the weaponization of data.” (Weekly)

WEATHER

Still in the mid-70s through the end of the week.

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DOWN, ON THE FARM

Photographer David Bacon shows the apple pickers and other farm workers of the Yakima Valley. As you’d expect, they reveal men and women leading tough lives performing hard, thankless work. (Atlantic)

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ROLIE POLIE OLY

Rumors say there might be a secret Legislative budget deal as early as today. (KOMO) (KING)

But negotiations are going on so secretly, the rest of us may have as little as a day to look at a budget before it has to be voted on. (SeaTimes) 

If there is a partial state-government shutdown, “some legislation that passed could be scrapped.” Among them: a bill to reduce the backlog of untested rape kits. (Weekly)

IN THE RESISTANCE

Sen. Cantwell says she’ll “use every tool we have” to stop the ACA repeal. (SeaTimes)

Some 22 million people could rejoin the uninsured under the repeal scheme. (Joel Connelly) 

While the Supreme Court temporarily reinstated parts of Travel Ban 2.0, many of the restrictions on it that Washington State argued for are still in effect. (SeaTimes) (NPR)

Local activists are already setting up practical means to combat the ban. (Joel Connelly) (KUOW)

THE RACE IS ON

We’ve now heard from the person who danced in a “mammy” (or “Poquito”) puppet costume at the Solstice Parade. Yep, it’s a white guy (who wants to stay unnamed). Yep, he insists he’s not racist. (Charles Mudede)

Gee Scott’s take on festering resentment over lingering racism: “It's not anger, it’s hurt.” (KIRO-FM)

POLICING THE POLICE

An ACLU-affiliated Seattle attorney says we shouldn’t expect any arrests in the Charleena Lyles killing. (KIRO-FM)

CITY HALL FOLLIES

Bill Nye’s taking time out from his climate-change speaking tour to promote Proposition 1, the “Access for All” education levy. (Slog)

SIC TRANSIT

The County agreed to sell the Convention Place transit-tunnel station and bus staging area to the state, for the big Convention Center expansion plan. Buses will continue to gather there for the next two years. (SeaTimes)

Mike McGinn, who wants to become the Grover Cleveland of Seattle mayors, also wants Fifth Avenue to become bus-only. (KIRO-FM)

O GIVE ME A HOME

Tacoma’s preparing to relocate up to 62 homeless folk into a literal “big tent.” (KING) 

THE PLANE TRUTH

Sea-Tac has lousy wifi and almost no phone-charging stations. Will it take a new Port Commission to change this? (South Seattle Emerald)

THE BIG A

Speakers at a retail-biz conference in Seattle said stores with physical locations must “create a unique experience” is they want to hold out against Amazon. (GeekWire)

GRUB

“Smart Catch,” a local program to promote the use of sustainable seafood in restaurants, will expand nationally. (KING)

SUDS

Fourteen years after the Olympia brewery closed, a microbeer plant will open near it in Tumwater. (Olympian)

BIZ

The current parent company of Eddie Bauer may sell off what’s left of the once-mighty, now debt-ridden, outdoor-wear retailer. (SeaTimes)

UPDATES

Individual health-insurance plans will still be offered in the two Washington counties where every company had said it would pull out. (SeaTimes)

SPORTS

The Mariners welcome Philadelphia for two games starting tonight.

The NFL’s merch-sales website mistakenly offers a license plate holder picturing the logo for the Washington DC team (you know, the one with that ethnically unfortunate name) over a silhouette of Washington State. (Slog)

TONIGHT

City Council informal hearing on the Charleena Lyles shooting. (UW Kane Hall)

“Lid I-5” open house. (Cloud Room)

Meatbodies, WIld Powwers. (Tractor)

Seattle Symphony presents “The Music of John Williams.” (Woodland Park Zoo)

Buster Williams Quartet. (Jazz Alley, thru Wed)

Arundhati Roy. (Town Hall)

Charles Johnson, in conversation with Garth Stein. (Third Place Books Ravenna)

Novelists Robert Lopez and Sam Ligon. (Elliott Bay Book Co.)

QUOTE-O-THE-DAY

(Alain de Botton‏):

"The powerful few only ever survive at the behest of the weak many. That's the social contract—on the other side of which: revolution."

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