»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
Walking Seattle
October 15th, 2009 by admin

The best way to see the Jet City—on foot!

The Queen City of the Pacific Northwest was once known principally for the spectacular forests, mountains, and waters surrounding it.

But now, what’s inside Seattle is as famous as what’s outside it. This is a vibrant young city full of attractions. It’s a center for several hi-tech industries and a crossroads of global cultures.

Seattle is also one of the most walkable cities in the country. It’s full of cozy bungalows, stately mansions, postmodern palaces, and outdoor art all over. It has wide boulevards, narrow cobblestone lanes, and carless pedestrian pathways. It seldom gets too cold to go walking, and almost never gets too hot.

These 35 specially designed urban treks are not only good exercise but are a great way to soak up the city’s history, culture, parks, and vibe.

Each walk’s commentary includes trivia about architecture, local culture, and neighborhood history, plus tips on where to dine, have a drink, or shop.

Each tour includes a clear neighborhood map and vital public transportation and parking information.

Route summaries make each walk easy to follow, and a “Points of Interest” section lists each walk’s highlights.

It’s Walking Seattle. It’s out NOW from Wilderness Press, a national outfit with offices in Cincinnati OH and Birmingham AL.

Get it, and get moving.

The book offers 35 different ways to know your city, each illustrated and mapped:

  1. Pioneer Square: Where Seattle Started
  2. Downtown Business District: Skyscrapers and Shopping
  3. Downtown, Off the Grid: The City Center, Off-Center
  4. Pike Place Market and First Avenue: Where Farmers Met Sailors
  5. Belltown and Seattle Center: All Yesterday’s Tomorrows
  6. South Lake Union: (Paul) Allen-Town
  7. The Waterfront: Pier Review
  8. Queen Anne Hill: Top of the Town
  9. Magnolia: Modern Mansions and Mudslides
  10. Discovery Park to the Ballard Locks: Army Issue
  11. Chinatown/International District: ‘Pan-Asian’ Before That Was a Word
  12. SoDo Industrial District: They Still Make Things Here
  13. Ballard: Ya Sure, Ya Betcha!
  14. Fremont: Center of At Least One Universe
  15. Wallingford and Roosevelt: Bizarre Gifts to Obscure Flicks
  16. Green Lake: Beware of Manic Joggers
  17. Phinney Ridge and Greenwood: The Zoo and Other Well Maintained Habitats
  18. Ravenna and Laurelhurst: Creekside Rambling
  19. The U District and University of Washington: Making the Grade
  20. Foster Island and the Arboretum: The Tree Museum
  21. Madrona to Madison Park: Gracious Living by a Lake
  22. Fairview and Eastlake: Gracious Living ON a Lake
  23. Interlaken and Montlake: An Urban Wilderness
  24. East Capitol Hill: Millionaires’ Row and Pioneer Graves
  25. West Capitol Hill: Broadway Bound
  26. Pike/Pine: Alternative Ground Zero
  27. First Hill: Pills, Prayers, and Paintings
  28. Central District: Soul Central
  29. Columbia City to Leschi: Between the Valley and the ‘Pits’
  30. Rainier Beach and Kubota Garden: The City’s Lower Edge
  31. Georgetown: In the Shadows of Boeing
  32. West Seattle, Junction to Admiral: A City Within the City
  33. Alki: Where Seattle (Really) Started
  34. West Marginal Way: Where Nature Meets Cargo
  35. Fauntleroy and Lincoln Park: Thick Trees at the Edge of the Sound

By the way, Walking Seattle has its own mobile online companion now, as an add-on virtual tour guide within the iOS/Android app ViewRanger!

Read the book before you go; then use the app to keep you on the path (unless you see a divergent way you really like).


5 Responses  
  • Tom Grothus writes:
    October 17th, 2011 at 9:10 pm

    Hi, Clark -

    Where’s the best local bookstore to buy your Walking Seattle book?

    I noticed the Bartell Drugs in Ballard is selling a Fremont Troll Cia Pet. I think they’re brought to market by Jeffrey Enterprises of San Francisco, but made in China like everything else in the store.

    While you’re in Ballard picking up your Fremont Troll Chia Pet you may as well stop by Zesto’s by Ballard High School and try their new Amanda Knox Burger and Fries.

    Send me an email. I have a business idea.

    Tom

  • Clark Humphrey writes:
    October 20th, 2011 at 7:25 pm

    Any good locally owned store can do, such as Elliott Bay, Third Place, University, etc.

  • Tonio writes:
    March 11th, 2012 at 10:29 pm

    Hi Clark, I bought your book in Ballard and I will be reading it as season approaches.
    We do walking tours beyond the touristy spots in Seattle and thought we can connect.
    It will be great to meet you.
    Tonio
    owner

  • Clark Humphrey writes:
    March 12th, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Yes. I would like to be a part of a tour operation based on this. Let’s talk soon.

  • Tonio writes:
    March 12th, 2012 at 8:12 pm

    It is slow season now but I am trying to put a group for this coming Monday 19. We will be departing from downtown at 10:30am and be back in downtown around 3:30pm. Let me know if you are available. My phone 206-446-3404 Tonio


Leave a Reply

»  Copyright 2012 Clark Humphrey (clark (at) miscmedia.com)   »  Substance: WordPress   »  Style: Ahren Ahimsa